Review: Richard Mille RM50-03 Tourbillon Split Seconds Chronograph Ultralight McLaren F1
Previous
RANDOM
Review: Panerai LAB-ID Luminor 1950 Carbotech™ 3 Days PAM00700
Next

Review: Laurent Ferrier Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F

With hands-on analysis and live photographs.
by Simon Neo on February 2, 2017
Negatives

Radical design changes with the tourbillon view on the dial, a huge departure from the original design principles of Laurent Ferrier.

In my previous review of Laurent Ferrier’s Galet Classic Square Tourbillon here, I observe the brand to be one that strongly emphasizes on certain values such as simplicity and elegance and these were all reflected in many of its designs. In fact, having previously worked at Patek Philippe for four decades, Laurent Ferrier believed in the horological values of simplicity, precision and pure, uncluttered beauty.

In this year’s SIHH, Laurent Ferrier released the Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F. On first look, we can see a radical shift in the design of the dial where the view of the tourbillon is presented face on. This is a huge departure from previous designs where the dial remains simple in design with hour markers on a circular satin-brushed chapter ring, keeping the dial in some ways low profile.

 

In the Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F, we see a radical design change with a tourbillon view on the dial side

In the Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F, we see a radical design change with a tourbillon view on the dial side

 

Case, Dial and Hands

The Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F comes in a 41 mm white gold case with a reasonable thickness of 12.7 mm. The round profile of the dial remains the same as per previous Galet Classic releases. We see other elements of the dial minimally changed such as the circular satin-brushed chapter ring and the silver-toned vertical satin-brushed finish in the centre.

 

Not many changes were noticed on the dial except for the inclusion of a tourbillon cage at the bottom of the dial.

Not many changes were noticed on the dial except for the inclusion of a tourbillon cage at the bottom of the dial.

 

The main attraction of the release is the tourbillon which is located at the 6 o’clock position of the dial. We were honestly surprised when we saw the changes made to the dial to accommodate a view of the tourbillon. This was certainly not anticipated considering Laurent Ferrier’s design principles and the horological values he strongly believed in, this was nowhere close to simplicity or pure and uncluttered beauty.

 

Does one pursue one's horological values or the interest of the consumer? This clearly reflects the latter in terms of a change in design principles.

Does one pursue one’s horological values or the interest of the consumer? This clearly reflects the latter in terms of a change in design principles.

 

We feel that these design modifications were made for commercial reasons, to allow the watch to sell well but in doing so, possibly contravening what the brand originally stood for from a horological values perspective. In addition, the view is of the back of the tourbillon which is not attractive, one that we felt was conveniently created using a specially-built bridge. Having said that, we find the finishing on the tourbillon cage of great standards, one that requires fifteen hours of work just for the bottom cage bridge due to the seventeen interior angles.

 

The Movement

The Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F is powered by the LF 619.03, a hand-wound movement which is chronometer-certified. The movement operates at 21,600 vph and has a power reserve of 80 hours. The tourbillon features two top-to-tail balance springs as well as two Geneva-type balance-spring stud-holders which are key differentiators of the brand.

 

Caseback view of the Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F

Caseback view of the Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F

 

Concluding Thoughts

The Galet Classic Tourbillon Double F is in our opinion disappointing from a horological values perspective. We can understand the need to design a watch which would be well-liked by the majority but to do so in a way that completely contravenes principles that made the brand what it is, perhaps is not acceptable. Nonetheless, the watch can still sell well given the appealing tourbillon view on the dial side but the watch has kind of lost its soul and does not bear the distinct trademarks that defines it as a Galet Classic.

 

What's your reaction?
I Love It
20%
Cool
13%
It's OK
40%
What?
0%
I Hate It
27%

Leave a Response

powered by gf
中文 | ENG